Wednesday, June 18, 2008

The Danish 'planes

I've had some requests for more 'aviation content'; so for those allergic to old aeroplanes, you may wish to skip this chapter; others may give it a go, and who knows, you might even find it interesting. Bev did suggest I tell you more too.


Denmark is a country where the two main aircraft collections are in opposite corners. If you went further in either direction - you fall off...

One direction is a place called Skjern, on the far western side of Jutland. If you leave Stanning airport in a westerly direction, there's a lake, a sand spit, and after that, the North Sea and Scotland. Someone decided that this was clearly the best place to gather all the main independent aviation collections in the country, including the Royal Danish Air Force's official collection. It's called the Danmarks Flymuseum. I don't give up easily on an aircraft museum (more on this anon) and so we slogged right across the country (Copenhagen being, basically, the other side) to get there. Ferries, trains and taxis were all involved, at Danish prices.

It was worth it.


The world's only surviving Hawker Danecock was part of the museum's display, and was a core item in the schools tour on the day we were there.

The funny thing about seeing a Danish museum volunteer giving a guided tour, is that's exactly what I do, but more than half a world away at the RAAF Museum at Point Cook. The language is different, but the subject, kids and skills required are essentially the same. They seemed interested, and though I couldn't understand any Danish, the themes subject were clear enough. He was doing a good job.

As well as the Danecock, they also have a wonderful range of Danish designed and built KZ aircraft, including two of their air ambulances. The very friendly museum staff kindly allowed me to cross the ropes and get lots of detail photographs of this and other aircraft for future publications. Cue happy author and (in the camera) some very hot batteries, plus 1,000 or so photos...


Great museum, and, should you find yourself about to fall off Denmark give it a go!


The radar seems to have a 'have a nice day' face. As it's connected to a missile system, maybe it's more like the defence system of Magrathea...

We then headed back, having seen from train windows a remarkable amount of Denmark. This included some of the first thatched houses we'd seen for quite some time, as well as black and white timber frame (below). We were impressed with the train service, the sheer number of Danish teenies travelling on the trains, how quiet and calm it all was (apart from near the teenies) and the convenience of the service.


There will be more...

James

1 comment:

oliver said...

keep them coming, james and bev...

i feel like i am going along the trip with you guys...

wished i could have actually tasted some of the food though...

ollie